Multicultural Psych II: Gender + Sexuality

The topic for the 3rd week’s lecture was gender and sexuality. I was looking most forward to this topic and thought it would generate a good discussion during our live class.

I was wrong. Yes, it was as interesting and enlightening as I imagined. I learned about muxes in Mexico, third genders in India, two-spirit Native Americans, and other trans and third gender people across culures. They seem to be more accepting of trans people abroad than in the “United States.”

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I have a Patreon!

I have made a Patreon for Rae’s Violet Words. It combines both my creative writing and my art, which can be found here.

If you don’t know how Patreon works, basically it’s a monthly thing split into tiers that you can choose from depending on the content you want. This can be pretty much anything from exclusive sneak peeks of new content to coloring pages.

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Freebird Book Review for Reedsy

Freebird is a nice, mostly lighthearted read for everyone. The poems are short and not overly complicated, which can be refreshing in these times of uncertainty. In other words, it’s a good quarantine read.

Freebird is divided into six parts: life, time, humanity, relationships, mind, and self-love. Some poems have a universal message, but most feel like a glimpse into the writer’s mind and life. Poems like that of “Existence” exemplify the universal feeling of tiredness. On the other hand, poems like “Fog” have that air of childhood nostalgia, a yearning for simpler times.

I don’t usually read books of poetry, but I chose this one for a change in my reading diet and am glad I did. The pages themselves are pleasant surprises with their doodles and sketches as visuals for the topic in each poem. The doodles range from cute to fun to silly to sometimes serious, adding to the overall entertainment aspect of the book.

Read the full review here!>>>>https://reedsy.com/discovery/book/freebird-laura-muensterer

RVW The Lobster Movie Review

This weird movie starring Colin Farrell chronicles a man, and others like him, checking into this hotel for single people. During the application process, they each have to choose an animal they’d like to be turned into. If at the end of the 45 days stay they’re still single, they’ll be turned into that animal and sent out into the world.

It’s a dystopian movie. Only couples can enjoy the city, taking trips and cohabitation. If you’re seen alone, authorities ask for papers proving you’re in a relationship. Also, at the hotel, it’s all about routine.

Scenarios are acted out by the staff, presumably, every morning as to how and how not to act in relationships and how women are safer from danger when accompanied by a man.

I wasn’t being held at gun point when watching this, but it sure felt like it.

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Nia and the Dealer Book Review

Originally published on Reedsy Discovery

Synopsis

Sixteen-year-old Nia has a history of running away in epic fashion. In 8th grade she ventured across Eastern Europe! But when Nia and her mom visit her grandmother in California for the summer, they both assume her juvenile escapist days are over. But her broken family’s lifestyle in San Francisco soon becomes dull and offensive, and Nia meets an intriguing young troubadour named Jesse. In typical teenage style, things change very quickly. Nia gets inspired by Holden Caulfield from Catcher in the Rye. She’s fuelled by news that her sage-like friend from her first fugitive adventure, Kurt, is dying only hundreds of miles away in San Diego. Add a lingering attraction to Jesse, and Nia’s rebellious California road trip becomes much more urgent.


Nia, a 16-year-old semi-delinquent, has a rocky relationship with her mother— who she has recently traveled to the U.S. with for a week— and an even rockier, tense relationship with her grandma. Nia herself is of Bulgarian heritage, and her grandma, Grandma Ross, is a born and raised American who refuses to understand Nia as she is. Nia’s mother, also American, is constantly torn between taking the side of her mother or defending Nia from her insults and judgements.

Read the full review here: https://reedsy.com/discovery/book/nia-and-the-dealer-dominic-carrillo

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