“Amber Waves of Grace”: Reedsy Discovery Book Review

There were a few times I didn’t understand what was going on in this story, but that did not detract from its appeal. Amber Waves of Grace manages to be charming in its own way and a story that feels certainly different from other romance books I’ve read. There are so many relationships to examine, from familial to church to romantic, that also added to confusion at times. Corrie being at the center of this story all aspects of her life, her relationship with two brothers, her parents, farm life, and her day-to-day troubles kept me reading until the end.

My initial expectations were disassembled from the first five pages. I went in fully expecting a lot of southern, tame, Christian romance and a few characters. A little conflict, but not much, just simple life. This story was not that, and I was pleasantly surprised. I think some knowledge of farming and farming equipment helps in visualizing what’s going on, but that’s one of this book’s few flaws that had me researching while reading. What’s a combine?

Continue reading ““Amber Waves of Grace”: Reedsy Discovery Book Review”

Freebird Book Review for Reedsy

Freebird is a nice, mostly lighthearted read for everyone. The poems are short and not overly complicated, which can be refreshing in these times of uncertainty. In other words, it’s a good quarantine read.

Freebird is divided into six parts: life, time, humanity, relationships, mind, and self-love. Some poems have a universal message, but most feel like a glimpse into the writer’s mind and life. Poems like that of “Existence” exemplify the universal feeling of tiredness. On the other hand, poems like “Fog” have that air of childhood nostalgia, a yearning for simpler times.

I don’t usually read books of poetry, but I chose this one for a change in my reading diet and am glad I did. The pages themselves are pleasant surprises with their doodles and sketches as visuals for the topic in each poem. The doodles range from cute to fun to silly to sometimes serious, adding to the overall entertainment aspect of the book.

Read the full review here!>>>>https://reedsy.com/discovery/book/freebird-laura-muensterer

Reinventing Hannah Reedsy Book Review

You can read my full review on Reedsy Discovery: https://reedsy.com/discovery/book/reinventing-hannah-jack-ori Below is an excerpt of my review.

At my age, and having not experienced extreme sexual assault, I don’t think I’m the target audience for this book. However, I think a young adult audience and survivors of sexual assault may gain more from this book than I did. The reigning message in this book, which is rape doesn’t diminish one’s value as a person and brings about lots of complexities. Granted it’s a sensitive subject, is handled well at first. However, it encompasses the entire plot of the story to the point I began to wonder if any closure or solution would be reached over the course of 300 pages.

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Nia and the Dealer Book Review

Originally published on Reedsy Discovery

Synopsis

Sixteen-year-old Nia has a history of running away in epic fashion. In 8th grade she ventured across Eastern Europe! But when Nia and her mom visit her grandmother in California for the summer, they both assume her juvenile escapist days are over. But her broken family’s lifestyle in San Francisco soon becomes dull and offensive, and Nia meets an intriguing young troubadour named Jesse. In typical teenage style, things change very quickly. Nia gets inspired by Holden Caulfield from Catcher in the Rye. She’s fuelled by news that her sage-like friend from her first fugitive adventure, Kurt, is dying only hundreds of miles away in San Diego. Add a lingering attraction to Jesse, and Nia’s rebellious California road trip becomes much more urgent.


Nia, a 16-year-old semi-delinquent, has a rocky relationship with her mother— who she has recently traveled to the U.S. with for a week— and an even rockier, tense relationship with her grandma. Nia herself is of Bulgarian heritage, and her grandma, Grandma Ross, is a born and raised American who refuses to understand Nia as she is. Nia’s mother, also American, is constantly torn between taking the side of her mother or defending Nia from her insults and judgements.

Read the full review here: https://reedsy.com/discovery/book/nia-and-the-dealer-dominic-carrillo

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